Welcome to Aqua Vision 16-18 June 2014

AquaVision is the biennial international aquaculture and food business conference organized to provide a platform and network for discussion at a strategic level on current and future concerns from consumption and marketing back to farming, fish processing and feeding.

Since its beginning in 1996 AquaVision has developed as a leading meeting place for decision makers in modern aquaculture worldwide.

A fully booked conference in 2012, with more than 450 stakeholders from 35 countries, showed the importance of AquaVision as a meeting place. Skretting and Nutreco look forward to welcoming you to Stavanger 16–18 June 2014 at this 10th World Aquaculture Business Conference.

More about AquaVision

News

The complex challenge of feeding the world’s growing population can only be properly addressed when all stakeholders – commercial operations, governments and NGOs – find genuinely fair and practical ways of working together, Sir Bob Geldof told delegates at AquaVision 2014.

AquaVision 2014, the 10th edition of the world business conference on aquaculture held in Stavanger, Norway, was officially closed today by Steven Rafferty, Managing Director of the Skretting Group.

Thanking more than 400 delegates from 45 countries for their participation in the busy conference programme, Rafferty said there was no doubt that the aquaculture industry is a winning industry, and as such it needs to find the most viable industrial species to feed a global population that is going to grow to 9 billion people by 2050.

The aquaculture industry needs to divert its focus away from coastal zones if it wants to avoid increased challenges in the future, delegates heard on day-two of AquaVision 2014.

Imagine a childhood without LEGO. While such a scenario seems unrealistic today, just one decade ago the globally iconic toy brand stood on the brink of collapse.

Opening day-two of AquaVision 2014 under the theme of ‘Beyond Tomorrow’, Professor David Robertson explained how in the last 10 years LEGO has turned its fortunes around to become one of the healthiest, most profitable and fastest growing companies in the toy industry today.

Sustainable aquaculture growth will be one of the main solutions to feeding a fast growing global population, delegates heard on day-one of the AquaVision 2014 conference in Stavanger, Norway.

One of the three core topic areas at this year’s conference is “Feeding 9 billion people”. According to the FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations), current global food production needs to increase 70% by 2050 in order to feed 2 billion additional people.

The idea of Japanese consumers eating sushi exported from a tiny African country with no coastline may sound improbable, but the Kingdom of Lesotho is pulling it off. Highlands Trout, which has been exporting 95% of its production to Japan since late 2012, is expected to increase its trout production from a current level of 2,000 tonnes to reach 10,000 tonnes a year in the next few years.

AquaVision and DSM Nutritional Products (DSM) are delighted to announce Egersund Net as the winner of the ‘DSM Innovation Award in Aquaculture’ at AquaVision 2014.  The ‘DSM Innovation Award in Aquaculture’ was created to reflect DSM’s unique history and dedication to provide industry leading micronutrient innovations in aquaculture worldwide as well as the role of AquaVision as a global forum to promote innovation in aquaculture. 

AquaVision 2014, the 10th edition of the world business conference on aquaculture, was officially opened today in Stavanger, Norway, by Knut Nesse, CEO of Nutreco.

Welcoming more than 400 delegates from 45 countries, including many top decision makers from the aquaculture industry, Nesse said aquaculture is about healthy and sustainable protein production.

The organisers of AquaVision 2014 are delighted to announce that Professor Jorgen Randers has been confirmed as one of the keynote speakers at the AquaVision 2014 conference on 16-18 June 2014 in Stavanger, Norway.

Professor Randers is one of the world’s most respected authorities on climate strategy. He believes there is arguably no subject as topical as climate change and our future development. As such, we must all take responsibility and be aware of our behaviours and the potential impact they have on our planet.

The world is not what it used to be. Perhaps more accurately, as French writer and philosopher Paul Valéry (1871-1945) suggested, “The trouble with our times is that the future is not what it used to be.” Volatility prevails, making it increasingly difficult to predict where market and business trends are headed. The challenge for any business is to be competitive and that is far more difficult when the rules of the game and the shape of the pitch keep changing.